AIR MISSION REQUESTS (Eastern Std Time)

NOTAMS

  • Fri 07 May
    Mods Packs 00 Update

    With 2.,7, some objects had to be removed to prevent the game from crashing.

  • Fri 07 May
    New mission creation and registration on BSD website

    Check out the new mission creation and registration on the website with this tutorial.

  • Sun 25 Apr
    SRS Client and Server Update

    1.9.6.0: BSD Server updated.

Spinning loader

SERVERS STATUS

BSD DEDICATED 1: ONLINE
BSD DEDICATED 2: ONLINE
BSD DEDICATED 3: OFFLINE

DCS Syria: Full map revealed

Following the pre-order availability, some screenshots of the F10 view were released. 600 km x 500 km of an area ideal for helicopter operations. Massive pre-orders at BSD!

Interview with Barundus

A 2 hours chat with a real life OH-58D instructor about how we should operate the Kiowa in DCS. Gold!

Matt Wagner flying over Syrian Map in Mi-8

It's not everyday we see Matt flying helicopter. This Syrian map must be something! Indeed the video is showing incredible level of details and helicopter bases!

BSD Newsletter July 2020 out!

This time, no email but a video. Hope you like this better!

DCS Newsletter July

Something about the Kiowa Warrior! Polychop simulations is keeping us on the edge with some news about their future release, the OH-58D Kiowa. No date except that it should happen this year. A mysterious new rocket type was mentioned (flechettes?) as well as special night vision feature (no idea). The availability of a moving map integrated in the MFD was also confirmed.

New round of screens for DCS Syria

Ugra Media posted Wednesday on ED forums quite a lot of screenshots of their next map DCS Syria. It looks like they are much closer to release it than any other product currently in development for DCS, but again let's wait and see. 

Flight Intercept training

A nice training while having fun with this great little GA aircraft in DCS: flight interception. Once everyone got the grip on the procedure, then the chase began. laughing 

Impromptu PG mission

We had to quickly intervene during our last mission to prevent enemy troops deployment along the UAE coast. Thank God, we had many BSD pilots on the call this day.

A  civilian heliport nearby allowed us to refuel

Some formation flight on the way back

Ka-50 update

A few renderings of the KA-50 update announced a few weeks ago by ED.  This update will include an entirely new cockpit and external model and textures. ED will include the latest technologies like deferred shading and physical based rendering. No ETA yet.

Black Shark Den Summer holiday

In case you are wondering why these first two weeks of August show an empty roster, that's because most of the instructors and mission builders are traveling abroad or enjoying hot summer days on the beach. Activity should resume after the 15th of August. A multi squadron event with the 906th is already planned on the 19th.

Black Shark Den meeting 2018

Second video from the Black Shark Den meeting in Hampton, GA. Meet some of our pilots, discover the Army Aviation Heritage Foundation, listen to the startup procedure review with Fargo and get another look at our 45 minutes flight. Remember to check out the first 360 video from the cockpit too if you missed that last week.

BlackSharkDen Annual meeting

From left to right, Ten-Beers, BaDCrC, Blackwolf, Eagle-Rising and Fargo. Awesome flight on board a UH-1H and a whole day the Army Aviation Heritage foundation in Hampton GA exchanging with Vietnam veterans pilots their experience of this iconic machine. An unforgettable moments for our BSD pilots and the first helicopter flight for Blackwolf!

From left to right: Ten Beers, BaDCrC, Blackwolf, Eagle_Rising, Fargo

360 degrees video of BSD UH-1H flight at Army Aviation Heritage Foundation

Persian Gulf extension

The recently release Persian Gulf map will soon see some additional airbases and also expanded road and rail network, increased mesh and texture resolution in the expanded area, many new towns and cities, "and other elements" according to a recent post from Wags.

Combat Flight 0.9.21 Beta currently tested by BSD

BSD continues to beta test this awesome software. The latest version offers now the PG map. We are hugely enjoying the possibilities of this amazing flight planning tool. This is going to be a must have as soon as it is released to the public.

Persian Gulf extension

The recently release Persian Gulf map will soon see some additional airbases and also expanded road and rail network, increased mesh and texture resolution in the expanded area, many new towns and cities, "and other elements" according to a recent post from Wags.

Combat Flight 0.9.21 Beta currently tested by BSD

BSD continues to beta test this awesome software. The latest version offers now the PG map. We are hugely enjoying the possibilities of this amazing flight planning tool. This is going to be a must have as soon as it is released to the public.

A close call last night

Flying low and close with Eagle last night over Normandy with Mi-8. Too fast. Not something to do with collideable trees! NOE is 60kt, not 120kt!

Caucasus 2 screenshots

These were just posted by Wags on ED's facebook page. Some details about this new map:

It will be FREE, Crimea is not coming back, new tree tech should go easier on fps. Fingers crossed.

Caucasus2

Caucasus2

Caucasus2

More screens from Miltech-5 on the BO-105

Still no in-game screenshots sadly. But it's good to see that our fellow BSD pilot SpiderPig will be on the left seat every time we fly this aircraft! cool He looks so happy!

Incoming (2 more weeks) Strait of Hormuz 

Beautiful new screenshots in today's newsletter of the future strait of Hormuz map.

Incoming (2 more weeks) Strait of Hormuz 

Beautiful new screenshots in today's newsletter of the future strait of Hormuz map.

More Caucasus screenshots

A little 'before and after' comparison of Batumi airport in 1.5 and 2.2 (the internal build before 2.5).

Batumi before and after

BO-105 news

Poly Dynamics is waiting for ED to create a new dedicated section on the forum for them and the BO-105. This section will be called Miltech-5 to avoid confusion with Poly Chop. While waiting for this to happen, the only news on the BO-105 can be found exclusively on their FB page.

Official BSD Mods Packs released! 

The set of official mods packs is now available in the Library (restricted) Mods section. You can download the whole pack as one file (3Gb) or each oVGME compatible zip file.Please follow carefully Gizzy's installation tutorial. These packs bring hundreds of new objects and skins that, we hope, will inspire you for your next missions. BSD Mods Packs are assumed to be correctly installed for the next missions for all the BSD pilots. 

A big thank you to Gizzy for the time he spent for our BSD community.

More screens from Miltech-5 on the BO-105

Still no in-game screenshots sadly. But it's good to see that our fellow BSD pilot SpiderPig will be on the left seat every time we fly this aircraft! cool He looks so happy!

Standard2

TASKS 1058

Training Range 2 

 


TASK NUMBER TITLE
1058 Perform Visual Meteorological Conditions Approach
1060 Select Landing Zone /Pickup Zone And Holding Area Reconnaissance
1062 Perform Slope Operations
1064 Perform Roll-On Landing
1066 Perform a Running Landing
1068 Perform Go-Around
1070 Respond To Emergencies
1155 Negotiate Wire Obstacles
1172 Perform Radio Navigation
1178 Perform Precision Approach
1182 Perform Unusual Attitude Recovery
1184 Respond To Inadvertent Instrument Meteorological Conditions
1188 Operate Aircraft Survivability Equipment
1262 Participate In A Crew-Level After-Action Review

TASK 1058 : PERFORM VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS APPROACH

CONDITIONS: In a helicopter with the before-landing check complete.

STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Select a suitable landing area (analyze suitability, barriers, wind, approach path, touchdown point, escape routes, and takeoff direction).
  2. Ensure that sufficient power exists for the type of approach/landing desired.
  3. Maintain a constant approach angle clear of obstacles to desired point of termination (hover) or touchdown (surface).
  4. Maintain rate of closure appropriate for the conditions.
  5. Maintain ground track alignment with the landing direction, as appropriate.
  6. Align aircraft with landing direction below 50 feet or as appropriate for transition from terrain flight.
  7. Select departure path for go-around during approach.
  8. Select tentative escape route.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will focus primarily outside the aircraft to provide obstacle clearance throughout the maneuver. The P* will announce when they begin the approach and whether the approach will terminate to a hover or to the surface. The P* also will announce the intended point of landing and any deviation to the approach to include go-around, if required.
    2. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will confirm the suitability of the area, assist in clearing the aircraft, and provide adequate warning of traffic and obstacles. The P and NCM will acknowledge any deviation during the approach. The P and NCM will announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when attention is reestablished outside.
  2. Procedures. Evaluate winds. Select an approach angle that allows obstacle clearance while descending to the desired point of termination. Once the termination point is sighted and the approach angle is intercepted, adjust the collective as necessary to establish and maintain a constant angle. Maintain entry airspeed until the rate of closure appears to be increasing. Above 50-feet above ground level (AGL), maintain ground track alignment and the aircraft in trim. Below 50-feet AGL, align the aircraft with the landing direction. Progressively decrease the rate of descent and rate of closure until reaching the termination point (hover, touchdown), or until a decision is made to perform a go-around.
    1. To a hover. The approach to a hover may terminate with a full stop over the planned termination point, or continued movement to transition to hovering flight. Progressively decrease the rate of descent and rate of closure until an appropriate hover is established over the intended termination point.
    2. To the surface. The decision to terminate to the surface with zero speed or with forward movement will depend on the aircraft's loading or environmental conditions. Touchdown with minimum lateral movement. After surface contact, ensure that the aircraft remains stable until all movement stops. Smoothly lower the collective to the full down position and neutralize the pedals and cyclic.
    3. Go-around. This is a planned maneuver with the aircraft under control. The P* should perform a go-around if a successful landing is doubtful or if visual reference with the intended termination point is lost. Once climb is established, reassess the situation and develop a new course of action.
    4. Escape route. This is an unplanned maneuver where in the aircraft may not be under complete control. Escape routes will normally be selected to the right-side of the approach path due to loss of tail rotor effectiveness (LTE) considerations.

Note: Performing this maneuver in certain environments may require hover out-of-ground effect (OGE) power. Evaluate each situation for power required versus power available.

Note: The P* should determine the torque required for the planned approach technique and announce the value to the P and NCM(s).

Note: A wind evaluation should be performed. Techniques for evaluating wind conditions are found in FM 1-202, Environmental Flight and appendix B of this ATM.

Note: Steep approaches can place the aircraft in potential settling-with-power conditions.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. Altitude, apparent ground speed, and rate of closure are difficult to estimate at night. The rate of descent during the final 100 feet should be slightly less than during the day to avoid abrupt attitude changes at low altitudes.
  2. After establishing the descent during unaided flights, airspeed may be reduced to approximately 50 knots until apparent ground speed and rate of closure appear to be increasing. Progressively decrease the rate of descent and forward speed until termination of maneuver.
  3. Surrounding terrain or vegetation may decrease contrast and degrade depth perception during the approach. Before descending below obstacles, determine the need for artificial lighting.
  4. When performing operations during unaided night flight, ensure that the searchlight or landing light (white light) is in the desired position. Use of the white light may impair night vision for several minutes. Therefore, exercise added caution if resuming flight before reaching full dark adaptation.

SNOW/SAND/DUST CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. Termination to a point OGE. This approach requires OGE power and may be used for some snow/sand/dust landings. Make the approach to a hover OGE over the intended landing location. Slowly lower the collective and allow the aircraft to descend. The rate of descent will be determined by the rate in which the snow/sand/dust is blown from the intended landing point. Remain above the snow/sand/dust cloud until it dissipates and visual references can be seen for touchdown. After ground contact, lower the collective to the full down position and neutralize the flight controls.
  2. Termination to the surface with forward speed. This termination may be made to an improved landing surface or suitable area with minimal ground references. Once the appropriate approach angle is intercepted, adjust the collective as necessary to establish and maintain the angle. As the apparent rate of closure appears to increase, progressively reduce the rate of descent and closure to arrive at the touchdown area slightly above effective translational lift. At this point, maintain the minimum rate of closure that ensures that the snow/sand/dust cloud remains behind the pilot's station. When the skids or heels of the skis contact the snow/ground, lower the collective and allow the aircraft to settle. Apply slight aft cyclic at touch down to prevent burying the skids or toes of the skis.
  3. Termination to the surface with no forward speed. This termination should be made to landing areas where slopes, obstacles, or unfamiliar terrain precludes a landing with forward speed. It is not recommended when new or powder snow or fine dust is present because white/brown out conditions will occur. The termination is made directly to a reference point on the ground with no forward speed. After ground contact, lower the collective to the full down position and neutralize the flight controls. Note: When landing in deep snow, the aircraft skids/skis may settle at different rates and the aircraft will normally terminate in a tail low attitude.

Note : During sand/dust landings, all doors and windows should be closed and vents closed.

Note : Hovering OGE reduces available ground references and may increase the possibility of spatial disorientation. Be prepared to transition to instruments and execute an instrument takeoff if ground reference is lost.

Note : At night, use of the landing, search, or anti-collision light may cause spatial disorientation while in blowing snow/sand/dust.

CONFINED AREA CONSIDERATIONS : An approach to the forward one-third of the useable area will reduce the approach angle and minimize power requirements. Prior to commencing the approach, the crew will determine and brief an escape route. During the approach, continue to determine the suitability of the area and the possible need for a go-around. If possible, make the decision to go-around before descending below the barriers or going below effective translational lift (ETL). After touching down, check aircraft stability as the collective is lowered.

MOUNTAIN/PINNACLE/RIDGELINE CONSIDERATIONS : Select a shallow to steep approach angle, depending on the wind, density altitude, gross weight, and obstacles. Before commencing the approach, the crew will determine and brief an escape route. During the approach, continue to determine the suitability of the intended landing point. The rate of closure may be difficult to determine until the aircraft is close to the landing area. Reduce airspeed to slightly above effective transitional lift until the rate of closure can be determined. Before reaching the near edge of the landing area, the descent should be stopped and the rate of closure slowed. At this point, decide whether to continue the approach or make a go-around. If a go-around is required, it should be performed before decelerating below ETL. If the approach is continued, terminate in the landing area to a hover or to the surface. After touching down, check aircraft stability as the collective is lowered. Note: To successfully operate into small areas, it may be necessary to place the nose of the aircraft over the edge of the landing area. This may cause a loss of important visual references when on final approach. All crewmembers must assist in providing information on aircraft position in the landing area.

MUD/MUSKEG/TUNDRA CONSIDERATIONS: Select a suitable area and terminate the approach to a 3-foot hover over the intended touchdown point. Begin a vertical descent until the aircraft touches down. Check aircraft stability while lowering the collective. If the area is suitable, lower the collective to the full down position and neutralize the cyclic and pedals.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. The evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


TASK 1060 : Select Landing Zone/Pickup Zone/Holding Area

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter and given a map or photo data.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus the following additions/modifications:

  1. Perform map, photo, or visual reconnaissance.
  2. Determine the LZ is suitable for operations and provide accurate and detailed information to supported unit (if applicable).
  3. Confirm suitability on initial approach.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions. The crew will confirm the location of plotted hazards and call out location of unplotted hazards.
    1. The PC will confirm suitability of the area for the planned mission. b. The P* will remain focused primarily outside the aircraft throughout the maneuver for aircraft control and obstacle avoidance. He or she will announce his or her intent to deviate from the maneuver.
    2. The P and NCM will assist in LZ reconnaissance and clearing the aircraft. They will provide adequate warning of obstacles and will acknowledge the P*'s intent to deviate from the maneuver.
  2. Procedures. Gather map or photo data on potential LZ(s) or conduct an in-flight suitability check if map or photo data is unreliable. Determine the suitability by evaluating size, long axis, barriers, surface conditions, tactical situation, and effects of the wind. Select a flight path, altitude, and airspeed that afford the best observation of the landing area, as required. Determine an approach, desired touchdown point, and departure path. The tactical, technical, and meteorological elements must be considered in determining suitability. Note. If wind conditions will be a factor, a wind evaluation should be performed. Techniques for evaluating wind conditions are found in FM 3-04.203. Note. Depending on the mission, an in-flight suitability check may not be feasible. Suitability may be determined by a map reconnaissance. Make a final determination of suitability upon arrival to the LZ/PZ.
    1. Tactical.
      1. Mission. Determine if the mission can be done from the selected LZ. Consider flight time, fuel, number of sorties, and access routes. (2) Location. To reduce troop fatigue, consider distance of PZ or LZ from supported unit or objective. Also consider the supported unit's mission, equipment, and method of travel to/from PZ/LZ.
      2. Security. Consider size and proximity of threat elements versus availability of security forces. The supported unit normally provides security. Consider cover and concealment, key terrain, avenues of approach and departure. The area should be large enough to provide dispersion.
    2. Technical.
      1. Number and type of aircraft. Determine if the size of the LZ can support all the aircraft at once or if they must rotate into LZ for in-flight linkup. (2) Landing formation. Plan landing formation for shape and size of LZ.
      2. Sling loads. For missions requiring sling loads at or near maximum gross weight of the helicopter, select larger LZs where barriers have minimum vertical development.
      3. Surface conditions. Consider slopes; blowing sand, snow, or dust. Be aware that vegetation may conceal surface hazards (for example, large rocks, ruts, or stumps). Areas selected should also be free of sources of rotor wash signature.
      4. Obstacles. Hazards within the LZ that cannot be eliminated must be plotted. Plan approach and departure routes over lowest obstacles.
    3. Meteorological.
      1. Ceiling and visibility. Ceiling and visibility are critical when operating near threat elements. IIMC recovery can expose the aircraft and crew to radar guided and heatseeking weapons, with few options for detection and avoidance. If one aircrew of a multiaircraft operation must respond to IIMC, the element of surprise will be lost, the assets onboard will not be available for the mission, and the entire mission may be at risk.
      2. Winds. Determine approach and departure paths.
      3. Pressure altitude. High PA may limit loads and, therefore, require more sorties.

Note . Avoid planning approach or departure routes into a rising or setting sun or moon.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. Unimproved and unlit areas are more difficult to evaluate at night because of low contrast. Knowledge of the various methods for determining the height of obstacles is critical to successfully completing this task. Visual obstacles such as shadows should be treated the same as physical obstacles.
  2. When performing operations during unaided night flight, ensure the searchlight or landing light (white light) is in the desired position. Using the white light will impair night vision for several minutes. Therefore, exercise added caution if resuming flight before reaching full dark adaptation.

CONFINED AREA CONSIDERATIONS : Determine a suitable axis and path for a go-around. For multiaircraft operations, determine the number of aircraft the area can accommodate safely.

SNOW/SAND/DUST CONSIDERATIONS : Evaluate surface conditions for the likelihood of encountering a whiteout/brownout. Determine a suitable axis and path for a go-around.

MOUNTAIN/PINNACLE/RIDGELINE CONSIDERATIONS : When practical, position the aircraft on the windward side of the area. Evaluate suitability—paying particular attention to PA and winds. Determine a suitable axis and escape route for a go-around. Operations at high altitudes are more likely to expose the crews to visual detection, radar, or heat-seeking weapons.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training may be conducted in the aircraft or FS.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references.


TASK 1062 : PERFORM SLOPE OPERATIONS

CONDITIONS : In a UH-1 helicopter.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Rated:
    1. Select a suitable landing area.
    2. Know the slope landing limitations.
    3. Maintain heading ±5 degrees.
    4. Maintain drift ±1 foot until touchdown and then no drift allowed.
  2. Nonrated.
    1. Confirm suitable landing area.
    2. Announce drift and altitude.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will announce their intent to perform a slope operation and establish the helicopter over the slope. The P* will announce their intended landing area and any deviation from the intended maneuver. The P* should be aware of the common tendency to become tense and, as a result, to over control the aircraft while performing the slope operation. The P* will note the aircraft attitude at a hover, prior to starting descent to land on the slope.
    2. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will provide adequate warning of obstacles, unannounced drift, or altitude changes. The P will monitor the aircraft attitude on the attitude indicator, and notify the P* prior to exceeding aircraft slope limitations. The P and NCM will confirm the suitability of the intended landing area and announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when attention is reestablished outside.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Landing. Select a suitable area for slope operations. If possible, orient the aircraft into the wind. Announce the initiation of the slope landing. Smoothly lower the collective until skids contact the ground. Adjust the cyclic to maintain the aircraft in a level attitude while maintaining heading with the pedals. Continue lowering the collective and simultaneously apply cyclic into the slope to maintain the position of the up slope skid until the landing gear is firmly on the ground. Coordinate the collective and cyclic to control the rate of attitude change when lowering the down slope skid to the slope. With the down slope skid on the ground, simultaneously lower the collective full down and neutralize the cyclic. If aircraft slope limits are reached before the aircraft is firmly on the ground, return the aircraft to a hover. Select a new area with less slope.
    2. Takeoff. Before takeoff, announce initiation of an ascent. Apply the cyclic into the slope to maintain the position of the up slope skid and smoothly increase the collective. Continue to increase the collective to raise the down slope skid, maintain heading with the pedals, and simultaneously adjust the cyclic to attain a hover attitude. As the aircraft leaves the ground, adjust the cyclic to accomplish a vertical ascent to a hover with minimum drift.

Note : Before performing slope operations, it is important to understand dynamic rollover characteristics.

Note : Crewmembers must be aware of the helicopter’s normal hovering attitude prior to putting a skid on the ground.

Note : If the successful completion of the landing is in doubt at any time, abort the maneuver and return to a hover.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. Select reference points to determine slope angles. (References probably will be limited and difficult to ascertain.)
  2. When performing operations during unaided night flight, ensure that the searchlight or landing light (white light) is in the desired position. Use of the white light may impair night vision for several minutes. Therefore, exercise added caution if resuming flight before reaching full dark adaptation.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


 TASK 1064 : Perform Roll-On Landing

CONDITIONS : In a Mi-8 helicopter or KA-50, given a suitable landing area, with the before landing check completed.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards and the following additions/modifications:

  1. Select a suitable landing area.
  2. Maintain a constant approach angle clear of obstacles to desire point of touchdown.
  3. Maintain a ground track alignment that aligns with the landing direction.
  4. Execute a smooth, controlled touchdown at speed appropriate for the conditions, but not exceeding 27 knots ground speed.
  5. Touchdown with a maximum of 10-degree nose high pitch attitude aligned with the landing directions ±5 degrees.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The P* will focus primarily outside the aircraft to clear the aircraft throughout the approach and landing. He or she will announce his intent to perform a roll-on landing, the intended point of landing, and any deviation from the approach. b. The P will verify the brakes are released before starting the approach.
    2. The P and NCM will confirm the suitability of the landing area as requested and will assist the P* in clearing the aircraft to warn of any traffic or obstacles.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Before starting the approach and touchdown.
      1. The P will verify the brakes are released. When the desired approach angle is intercepted, the P* will lower the collective as required to establish the descent and adjust as necessary to maintain a constant angle of approach.
      2. The P* will maintain entry airspeed until reaching approximately 100 feet AGL or a point from which the obstacles can be cleared. He or she will then assume a decelerating attitude (approximately 5 to 10 degrees, nose high) to effect a touchdown on the main landing gear.
      3. The NCM will inform the P* when the rear of the aircraft is clear of all obstacles in the flight path.arch 2010
      4. The P* will slip the aircraft during the deceleration to achieve runway alignment upon touchdown.
      5. The P* will maintain the desired angle of descent with the collective. Prior to touchdown, the P* will adjust the collective control to affect a smooth touchdown on the main landing gear before going below ETL. Note. For training, establish entry airspeed 70 KIAS, ±10 KIAS.
    2. After landing.
      1. The P* will maintain the landing attitude with the cyclic and collective control (not to exceed 10 degrees nose high) until forward speed is sufficiently slowed or stopped. The P* will smoothly lower the collective until the nose gear contacts the ground.
      2. The P* will then neutralize the flight controls and apply brakes as necessary to stop forward movement.

Note . Do not use aerodynamic braking to slow the aircraft down once the nose gear is in contact with the ground.

ROUGH/UNPREPARED SURFACE CONSIDERATIONS : Closely monitor touchdown speed when landing to a rough or unprepared surface. Consistent with the situation and aircraft capabilities, a more pronounced deceleration before touchdown coupled with stronger aerodynamic braking after touchdown may be appropriate. Note. The wheel brakes may be less effective. If the surface is soft, exercise care when lowering the collective until the aircraft comes to a complete stop.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS : Altitude, apparent ground speed, and rate of closure are difficult to estimate at night. After establishing the descent, the P* should reduce airspeed to approximately 70 KIAS and maintain airspeed until the apparent ground speed and slightly slower than during the day to avoid abrupt attitude changes at low altitudes. The P* should progressively decrease the rate of descent and forward speed until he or she terminates the maneuver.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS :

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft or FS.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references.


TASK 1066 : PERFORM A RUNNING LANDING

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter with the before-landing check complete.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Select a suitable landing area.
  2. Maintain ground track alignment with the landing direction.
  3. Maintain a constant approach angle clear of obstacles to desired touchdown point.
  4. Touchdown aligned with landing direction ± 5 degrees, at/slightly above effective transitional lift (ETL).

DESCRIPTION :

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will remain focused outside the aircraft to clear the aircraft throughout the approach and landing. The P* will announce the intended point of landing and any deviation from the approach.
    2. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will confirm the suitability of the area, assist in clearing the aircraft, and provide adequate warning of traffic or obstacles. They will announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft.
  2. Procedure.
    1. Determine a shallow approach angle that allows safe obstacle clearance to arrive at the intended point of landing. Once the approach angle is intercepted, adjust the collective as necessary to establish and maintain the angle. Maintain entry airspeed until apparent ground speed and rate of closure appear to be increasing. Maintain ground track alignment with the landing direction by maintaining the aircraft in trim above 50 feet above ground level (AGL) and aligning the aircraft with the landing direction below 50 feet AGL. Control the rate of descent at touchdown with the collective. Maintain aircraft attitude and landing alignment with the cyclic and heading with the pedals. The touchdown speed may vary from ETL to slightly above ETL as dictated by landing area conditions.
    2. After ground contact, ensure the aircraft remains stable as the collective is lowered to reduce ground run. Once the aircraft has come to a complete stop, reduce the collective to the fully down position and neutralize the pedals and cyclic. Note: This maneuver may be performed in an environment where obscurants (for example, sand, dust, or snow) are present.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. Altitude, apparent ground speed, and rate of closure are difficult to estimate at night. The rate of descent during the final 100 feet should be slightly less at night than during the day to avoid abrupt attitude changes at low altitudes.
  2. After establishing the descent during unaided flights, airspeed may be reduced to approximately 50 knots until apparent ground speed and rate of closure appear to be increasing. Progressively decrease the rate of decent and forward speed until termination of maneuver.
  3. Surrounding terrain or vegetation may decrease contrast and cause degraded depth perception during the approach. Before descending below obstacles, determine the need for artificial lighting.
  4. When performing operations during unaided night flight, ensure that the searchlight or landing light (white light) is in the desired position. Use of the white light may impair night vision for several minutes. Therefore, exercise added caution if resuming flight before reaching full dark adaptation.

ROUGH/UNPREPARED SURFACE CONSIDERATIONS: Closely monitor touchdown speed when landing to a rough or unprepared surface. If the surface is soft, exercise care when lowering the collective until the aircraft comes to a complete stop.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS :

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. The evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references.


TASK 1068 : Perform Go-Around

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter

STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards and the following additions/modifications:

  1. Determine when a go-around is required.
  2. Immediately apply climb power (not to exceed aircraft limits).
  3. Accelerate to climb airspeed ±10 knots.
  4. Maintain aircraft in trim.
  5. Maintain appropriate ground track.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The P* will announce the intent to perform a go-around and will remain primarily focused outside to avoid obstacles.
    2. The P and the NCM will assist in clearing the aircraft and provide adequate warning of obstacles. The P will also monitor systems instruments to ensure aircraft limits are not exceeded.
    3. The P or NCM may call for a “go-around” if they detect an unsafe landing area. The P* will acknowledge and initiate the “go-around.”
  2. Procedures.
    1. When it becomes doubtful a safe landing can be accomplished, announce "go-around." Immediately increase power and simultaneously adjust pitch attitude to stop the descent and start a climb to clear any obstacles.
    2. Maintain aircraft in trim and accelerate to the appropriate climb speed for conditions.
    3. Maintain the appropriate ground track.

Note. The decision to go-around may be made at any time, but in limited power situations should be determined before descending below the barriers or decelerating below ETL.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS : A go-around should be initiated if visual contact with the landing area is lost.

SNOW/SAND/DUST CONSIDERATIONS : If, during the approach, visual reference with the landing area or obstacles is lost, initiate a go-around immediately. Be prepared to transition to instruments and perform an instrument takeoff. Once VMC is regained, continue with the go-around.

MOUNTAINOUS AREA CONSIDERATIONS : If, at any time during an approach, insufficient power is available or turbulent conditions or wind shift create an unsafe condition, perform a go-around immediately. Perform one of the following:

  1. Where escape routes exist, turn the aircraft away from the terrain, apply forward cyclic, and lower the collective, if possible. Accelerate the aircraft to an appropriate airspeed for conditions and complete the go-around.
  2. Where escape routes do not exist, adjust aircraft for maximum rate of climb to ensure obstacle clearance. Upon clearing obstacles, accelerate aircraft to an appropriate airspeed for conditions and complete the go-around.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft or FS.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references.


TASK 1070 : Respond to emergencies

CONDITIONS: In a helicopter; or academically and given a specific emergency condition or the indications of a specific malfunction.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Rated.
    1. Identify the malfunction, determine the appropriate emergency procedure, and perform or describe the appropriate immediate action procedures required.
    2. Lock shoulder harness, make mayday call, and tune transponder to emergency, as required.
  2. Nonrated.
    1. Prepare the aircraft, crew, and passengers for an emergency landing. Ensure passenger seat belts are on and crew shoulder harnesses are locked.
    2. Look for a suitable landing area and alert the crew to the landing area’s location.
    3. Assist in evacuating passengers to designated assembly area in accordance with the crew briefing.

DESCRIPTION :

  1. Crew actions. Any crewmember detecting an emergency will immediately announce the emergency to the other crewmembers.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will perform the underlined and non-underlined steps as appropriate depending on the environmental or aircraft conditions as per the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual/checklist (CL) and initiate the appropriate type of landing. During visual meteorological conditions (VMC), the P* will focus primarily outside the aircraft to maintain aircraft control and to provide adequate clearance from traffic or obstacles. During instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), the P* will remain focused inside the aircraft on the flight instruments to maintain aircraft control.
    2. The pilot not on the controls (P) will perform as directed or briefed. The P will perform the underlined and non-underlined steps as per the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual/CL. If time permits, the P will verify all emergency checks with the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual/CL. They will request appropriate emergency assistance as described in the flight information handbook (FIH).
    3. The nonrated crewmember (NCM) will prepare the passengers for an emergency landing. During the descent the NCM will look for a suitable landing area, alert the crew to the landing area’s location and assist in clearing the aircraft. After landing, the NCM will assist in evacuating the passengers to the designated assembly area. If normal exits cannot be used, the NCM will use the nearest emergency exit to expedite the evacuation. The P will keep communications to a minimum to allow the P* or P to attempt communications outside the aircraft. After accounting for all crewmembers and passengers, the NCM will assist the other crewmembers in any follow-on action (fire fighting, first aid, emergency signaling, or survival equipment).
  2. Procedures. Analyze the information given (for example, aircraft response, caution or advisory lights, and audio warnings). Determine the malfunction and select the appropriate emergency procedure. Perform the emergency procedure per the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual/CL.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS : Take special precautions to identify the correct switches when performing emergency procedures at night or while wearing NVGs.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft, simulator or academically.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft, simulator or academically.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


TASK 1155 : NEGOTIATE WIRE OBSTACLES

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Locate and estimate the height of wires.
  2. Determine the best method to negotiate the wire obstacle.
  3. Safely negotiate the wire obstacle, minimizing the time unmasked.

DESCRIPTION :

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will remain focused primarily outside the aircraft and will announce visual contact with wires and supporting structures.
    2. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will announce visual contact with wires and supporting structures. They will also provide adequate warning to avoid hazards, wires, poles, or supporting structures. They will announce when the aircraft is clear and when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when attention is reestablished outside.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Announce when wires are seen. Confirm the location of wire obstacles with other crewmembers. Announce the method of negotiating the wires and when the maneuver is initiated.
    2. Discuss the characteristics of wires and estimate the amount of available clearance between them and the ground to determine the method of crossing. Locate guy wires and supporting poles.
      1. Overflight. Before crossing the wires, identify the highest wire. Cross near a pole to aid in visual perception and minimize the time that the aircraft is unmasked.
      2. Underflight/ground taxi. When under flying wires, there must be a minimum ground to wire clearance of hover height plus 25 feet. Ground speed should be no greater than that of a brisk walk. Ensure lateral clearance from guy wires and poles. If terrain is suitable, consideration should be given to ground taxiing under the wires.

Note: The crew must maintain proper scanning techniques to ensure obstacle avoidance and aircraft clearance.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS: Wires are difficult to detect at night and with NVGs. Underflight of wires should not be performed at night or while using NVGs, unless the location has been checked during daylight conditions and all hazards have been identified.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references.


TASK 1172 : Perform radio navigation

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) or simulated IMC, with navigation checks complete, and given appropriate navigational publications.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Tune and identify appropriate navigational aids (NAVAIDs).
  2. Determine aircraft position.
  3. Intercept and maintain the desired course.
  4. Identify station passage.

DESCRIPTION :

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will remain focused inside the aircraft and will monitor radios and air traffic control (ATC) information. The P* will announce any deviation not directed by ATC or the pilot not on the controls (P) and will acknowledge all directives given by ATC or the P.
    2. The P will select and announce radio frequencies and will monitor radios and ATC information not monitored by the P*.
    3. During visual meteorological conditions (VMC) or simulated IMC, the P and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will focus primarily outside the aircraft to provide adequate warning of traffic or obstacles. They will announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when attention is reestablished outside.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Before flight, when the use of the automatic direction finder (ADF) is expected, ensure that the ADF will receive on the desired band and the Number 1 bearing pointer points in the direction of the selected station.
    2. Before flight when the use of the very high frequency omni-directional range (VOR)/ instrument landing system (ILS) receiver is expected, ensure that the VOR is operational and the vertical speed indicator (VSI) and course deviation indicator (CDI) are providing the proper indications per the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual.
    3. Before using a selected NAVAID for navigation, tune and identify the NAVAID. After identifying the desired station and the position of the aircraft in relation to the desired course, turn to an appropriate intercept heading. Maintain the intercept heading until approaching an on-course indication. Depending on the rate of closure, start a turn to intercept the desired course.
    4. Maintain heading to track the desired course. If the navigational instruments show an offcourse condition, turn as necessary toward the course to re-intercept. If navigational instruments do not indicate movement toward the course within a reasonable time, increase the intercept angle. When re-intercepting the course, turn toward the course and apply the appropriate drift correction (normally one-half of the intercept angle). Continue to bracket the course by decreasing corrections until obtaining a heading that will maintain the aircraft on course. Determine arrival at radio intersections per procedures in FM 1-240 or aeronautical information manual (AIM). Identify station passage by observing the first complete reversal of the bearing pointer and/or the TO-FROM indicator on the CDI.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training may and be conducted in the aircraft or simulator.
  2. Evaluation may be conducted in the aircraft or simulator.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


 

Standard2

TASKS 1000-1052

Training Range 2 

 

TASK NUMBER TITLE
1000 Participate In A Crew Mission Briefing
1004 Plan a Visual Flight Rules Flight
1011 Determine Aircraft Performance Parameters Using Tabular Data
1016 Perform internal load operations
1026 Maintain Airspace Surveillance
1028 Perform Hover Power Check
1030 Perform Hover Out-of-Ground Effect Check
1032 Perform Radio Communications Procedures
1034 Perform Ground Taxi
1038 Perform Hovering Flight
1040 Perform Visual Meteorological Condition Takeoff
1044 Navigate By Pilotage And Dead Reckoning
1046 Perform Electronically Aided Navigation
1048 Perform Fuel Management Procedure
1052 Perform Visual Meteorological Condition Flight Maneuvers

TASK 1000: Participate in a crew mission briefing

CONDITIONS : Before flight in a helicopter, given DA Form 5484 ( Mission Schedule/Briefing ) and a unit-approved crew briefing checklist.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  • The pilot in command (PC) will actively participate in and acknowledge an understanding of DA Form 5484 mission briefing.
  • The PC will conduct or supervise an aircrew mission briefing using figure 4-1 or a more detailed unit-approved crew briefing checklist.
  • Crewmembers will verbally acknowledge a complete understanding of the aircrew mission briefing.

DESCRIPTION:

  • Crew actions.
    • A designated briefing officer will evaluate and brief essential areas of the mission to the PC in accordance with AR 95-1. The PC will acknowledge a complete understanding of the mission brief and initial DA Form 5484.
    • The PC has overall responsibility for the crew mission briefing. The PC may direct other crewmembers to perform all or part of it.
    • Crewmembers will direct their attention to the crewmember conducting the briefing. They will address any questions to the briefer and acknowledge that they understand the assigned actions, duties, and responsibilities. Lessons learned from previous debriefings should be addressed as applicable during the crew briefing.

Note : An inherent element of the mission briefing is establishing the time and location for the crew level after-action review. (See Task 1262)

  • Procedures. Brief the mission using a unit-approved crew mission briefing checklist.

Table below shows a suggested format for the minimum mandatory crew-briefing checklist. Identify mission and flight requirements that will demand effective communication and proper sequencing and timing of actions by the crewmembers.

CREW BRIEFING CHECKLIST
  1. Mission overview.
  2. Execution.
    1. Flight routes and altitudes.
    2. Estimated time en route
    3. Fuel and refuel requirements
    4. Weather and NOTAMS. Departure, en route, destination, and void time.
    5. Required items, mission equipment, and personnel.
  3. Airspace surveillance procedures (Task 1026).
    1. Assign primary scan sectors.
  4. Analysis of the aircraft.
    1. Logbook and preflight deficiencies.
    2. Performance planning.
      1. Recompute PPC, if necessary.
      2. Predicted hover torque.
      3. Max torque available and GO / NO GO data.
      4. VNE.
    3. Mission deviations required based on aircraft analysis.
  5. Crew actions, duties, and responsibilities.
    1. Crew Coordination (two challenge rule, most conservative response, standard terminology).
    2. Transfer of flight controls (3-way positive).
  6. Emergency actions.
    1. Mission considerations.
    2. Inadvertent instrument meteorological conditions (IMC).
    3. Egress procedures, removal of injured personnel and rendezvous point.
    4. Actions to be performed by pilot on the controls (P*), pilot not on the controls (P), and nonrated crewmember (NCM).
    5. NVG failure.
  7. Emergency coordination.
    1. Aircraft control.
    2. Engine failure.
    3. Dynamic rollover.
    4. Servo hardover.
  8. General crew duties.
    1. Pilot on the controls (P*).
      1. Fly the aircraft - primary focus outside when visual meteorological conditions (VMC), inside when IMC.
      2. Avoid traffic and obstacles.
      3. Crosschek systems and instruments
      4. Monitor/transmit on radios as directed by the pilot in command (PC)
    2. Pilot not on the controls (P).
      1. Assists in traffic and obstacle avoidance.
      2. Tune radios and set transponder.
      3. Navigate.
      4. Copy clearances, automatic terminal information servives (ATIS) and mission information.
      5. Crosscheck systems and instruments.
      6. Monitor/transmit on radios as directed by the PC.
      7. Read and complete checklist items as required.
      8. Announce when focused inside for more than 2 to 3 seconds (VMC) and back outside.
    3. Both pilots
      1. Weapons (WPNs), sights and aircraft survivability equipment (ASE) considerations.
    4. Crew chief, medic and other assigned crewmembers
      1. Secure passengers and cargo
      2. Assist in traffic and obstacle clearance
      3. Perform other duties assigned by the PC.
    5. Risk assessment considerations
    6. Crewmembers' questions, comments and acknowledgment of mission briefing.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS :

  1. Training will be conducted academically.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted academically.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references plus the following: FM 3.04-300, DA Form 5484


TASK 1004 : Plan a visual flight rules flight

CONDITIONS : Before visual flight rules (VFR) flight in a helicopter and given access to weather information, notice to airmen (NOTAM), flight planning aids, necessary charts, forms, publications, and weight and balance information.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  • Determine if the aircrew and aircraft are capable of completing the assigned mission.
  • Determine if the flight can be performed under VFR.
  • Determine the correct departure, en route, and destination procedures.
  • Select route(s) and altitudes that avoid hazardous weather conditions and best ensure mission completion without exceeding aircraft or equipment limitations. If appropriate, select altitudes that conform to VFR cruising altitudes.
  • For cross-country flights, determine the distance ±1 nautical mile, true airspeed ±5 knots, ground speed ±5 knots, and estimated time en route (ETE) ±1 minute for each leg of the flight. Compute magnetic heading(s) ±5 degrees.
  • Determine the fuel required ±100 pounds.
  • Verify the aircraft will remain within weight and center of gravity (CG) limitations.
  • Verify aircraft performance data and ensure sufficient power is available to complete the mission.
  • Complete the flight plan.
  • Perform mission risk assessment per unit SOP.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot in command (PC) will ensure that all crewmembers are current and qualified to perform the mission. The PC also will determine whether the aircraft is equipped to accomplish the assigned mission. The PC may direct the other crewmembers to complete some elements of the VFR flight planning.
    2. The other crewmembers will complete the assigned elements and report the results to the PC.
  2. Procedures. Using appropriate military, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), or hostcountry weather facilities, obtain information about the weather. After ensuring that the flight can be completed under VFR per AR 95-1, check notices to NOTAMs, chart update manuals (CHUMS) and other appropriate sources for any restrictions that apply to the flight. Obtain navigational charts that cover the entire flight area, and allow for changes in routing that may be required because of the weather or terrain. Select the course(s) and altitude(s) that will best facilitate mission accomplishment. Determine the magnetic heading, ground speed, and ETE for each leg. Compute total distance, flight time, and calculate the required fuel using a CPU-26A/P computer/Weems plotter (or equivalent) or air mission planning station (AMPS). Determine if the duplicate weight and balance forms in the aircraft logbook apply to the mission per AR 95-1. Verify that the aircraft weight and CG will remain within allowable limits for the entire flight. Complete the appropriate flight plan and file it with the appropriate agency.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS : More detailed planning is necessary at night because of visibility restrictions. Checkpoints used during the day may not be suitable for night or NVG use.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  • Training will be conducted academically.
  • Evaluation will be conducted academically.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references.


TASK 1011 : Determine aircraft performance parameters using tabular data

CONDITIONS : In a UH-1 helicopter or in a classroom environment, given aircraft gross weight (GWT) and pressure altitude (PA) and free air temperature (FAT), compute the aircraft maximum GWT, out of ground effect (OGE) torque required and in-ground effect (IGE) torque required from tabular data.

STANDARDS :

  1. Compute maximum torque TQ ± 1 psi.
  2. Compute maximum OGE GWT ± 100 pounds.
  3. Compute hover TQ ± 1 psi.

DESCRIPTION :

  1. Crew actions. The pilot in command (PC) will compute or direct other crewmembers to compute the aircraft performance data using the tab data from the operator’s manual. The PC will verify the accuracy of the computations, and ensure aircraft performance meets mission requirements. Limitations will not be exceeded.
  2. Procedures.

Note : When significant changes in the mission conditions occur, recompute the values. A significant change is defined as an increase of ±5 degrees, +500 feet PA or +200 pounds.

Hover Data

  1. PA – enter in the PA column.
  2. FAT – enter in the FAT column.
  3. Maximum OGE weight – read the maximum OGE weight.
  4. OGE hover torque – read the OGE torque needed to lift the maximum OGE weight.

Note : If the OGE weight is less than the structural limit, then the OGE hover torque is also the maximum torque. The engine is limited by exhaust gas temperature.

       5. IGE hover torque – read the IGE torque needed to lift the maximum OGE weight.

       6. For training purposes your hover power will be 1 psi of TQ less/more for every 200 pounds difference between the OGE weight and the aircraft’s actual GWT.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted academically or in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted academically or in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Tabular Data


TASK 1016: Perform internal load operations

CONDITIONS : In a UH-1 helicopter loaded with passengers/cargo.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Rated.
    1. Perform or ensure that a thorough passenger briefing has been conducted and that a passenger manifest is on file, if applicable. (See Task 1002.)
    2. Ensure that the passengers and cargo are restrained.
    3. Ensure that floor-loading limits are not exceeded.
  2. Nonrated.
    1. Perform a thorough passenger briefing and ensure that a passenger manifest is on file, if applicable. Conduct the briefing per the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual/checklist (CL) and unit standing operating procedures (SOPs).
    2. Load the aircraft per the load plan, if applicable.
    3. Ensure that floor-loading limits are not exceeded.
    4. Secure passengers and cargo in accordance with the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot in command (PC) will formulate a load plan, ensure that a DD Form 365-4 (Weight and Balance Form F–Transport/Tactical) is verified, if required, and ensure that the aircraft will be within gross weight (GWT) and center of gravity (CG) limits. The PC will ensure that the crew loads the cargo, proper tie down procedures are used, and any passengers receive a briefing. The PC will determine whether the aircraft is capable of completing the assigned mission and will ensure that aircraft limitations will not be exceeded.
    2. The pilot on the controls (P*) will perform a hover power check before takeoff and ensure the maximum allowable GWT of the aircraft is not exceeded.
    3. The nonrated crewmember (NCM) will ensure passengers are seated and are wearing seat belts before takeoff. The NCM will monitor passengers and cargo during the flight for security.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Load cargo per the cargo plan or DD Form 365-4, as appropriate. Secure and restrain all cargo to meet restraint criteria. For additional information, see Task 1012, Verify aircraft weight and balance.
    2. Brief passengers for the flight and seat them according to the load plan or DD Form 365-4, as appropriate. Conduct the briefing per the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual/CL, unit SOP and information about the mission. Ensure that the passengers understand each element of the briefing. Note : If the aircraft is not shut down for loading, a passenger briefing may be impractical. Passengers may be prebriefed or passenger-briefing cards may be used per local directives or the unit SOP. Note : Hazardous cargo will be handled, loaded, and transported per AR 95-27.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training may be conducted in the aircraft or academically.
  2. Evaluation may be conducted in the aircraft or academically.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references plus the following:

AR 95-27 , FM 10-450-2 , TM 55-1500-342-23 , DA Pam 738-751


TASK 1026 : MAINTAIN AIRSPACE SURVEILLANCE

CONDITIONS: In a helicopter in visual meteorological conditions (VMC) conditions.

STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Brief airspace surveillance procedures prior to flight and assign primary scan sectors for each crewmember.
  2. Announce drift or altitude changes, clear the aircraft, and immediately inform other crewmembers of all air traffic or obstacles that pose a threat to the aircraft.
  3. Announce when attention is focused inside the aircraft for more than 2 to 3 seconds and then announce when attention is focused back outside.
  4. Maintain airspace surveillance in assigned scan sectors.
  5. When landing, the crew will confirm the suitability of the area and that the aircraft is clear of barriers.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot in command (PC) will brief airspace surveillance procedures prior to the flight. The briefing will include areas of responsibility and primary scan sectors.
    2. The pilot on the controls (P*) will announce his intent to perform a specific maneuver and will remain focused outside the aircraft. The P* is responsible for clearing the aircraft and obstacle avoidance.
    3. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM), as duties permit, will assist in clearing the aircraft and will provide adequate warning of obstacles, unusual drift, or altitude changes. They will announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when attention is reestablished outside.
    4. When landing, the crew will confirm the suitability of the area and that the aircraft is clear of barriers.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Maintain close surveillance of the surrounding airspace. Keep the aircraft clear from other aircraft and obstacles by maintaining visual surveillance (close, mid, and far areas) of the surrounding airspace. Inform the crew immediately of air traffic or obstacles that pose a threat to the aircraft. Call out the location of traffic or obstacles by the clock, altitude, and distance method. (The 12 o'clock position is at the nose of the aircraft.) Give distance in miles or fractions of miles for air traffic and in feet for ground obstacles. When reporting air traffic, specify the type of aircraft (fixed-wing or helicopter) and, if known, the model. The altitude of the air traffic should be reported as the same altitude, or higher, or lower than the altitude at which you are flying.
    2. Prior to changing altitude, visually clear the aircraft for hazards and obstacles inclusive of what is ahead, above, below, and to the left and right of the aircraft.
    3. Prior to performing a descending flight maneuver, it may sometimes be desirable to perform “S” turns to the left or right. The clearing “S” turns will provide the aircrew with a greater visual scan area.
    4. During a hover or hovering flight, inform the P* of any unannounced drift or altitude changes. When landing, the crew will confirm the suitability of the area.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS: The use of proper scanning techniques will assist in detecting traffic and obstacles, and in avoiding spatial disorientation. Hazards such as wires are difficult to detect.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


TASK 1028 : PERFORM HOVER POWER CHECK

CONDITIONS: In a helicopter at an appropriate hover height and with performance planning information available.

STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Determine if sufficient power is available to perform the mission.
  2. Determine if wind condition exceeds directional control margin (DCM) or longitudinal cyclic values.
  3. Determine when the approach can be terminated to the ground due to center of gravity (CG) limits, if applicable (using indicated fuel).

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will announce his intent to bring the aircraft to a hover. The P* will remain focused outside the aircraft during the maneuver and will announce when the aircraft is stabilized at the desired hover altitude.
    2. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will announce when ready for takeoff and will remain focused outside the aircraft to assist in clearing and to provide adequate warning of obstacles. They will acknowledge clear (left, right, rear, and above, as appropriate).
    3. The P will monitor the aircraft instruments. If the IGE NO-GO torque value is indicated prior to reaching the planned hover height used during the performance planning, the P will tell the P* to stop the hover power check and land the aircraft. The PC will confirm the GO / NO-GO torque and adjust the mission as required.
    4. The PC will determine whether the aircraft is capable of completing the assigned mission and will ensure that aircraft limitations will not be exceeded.
    5. The P will announce when the hover power check is completed.
  2. Procedures.
    1. The P* should use a 5-foot stationary hover (2-foot stationary hover when using tabular data) when performing this task unless the mission or terrain constraints dictate otherwise. If another hover height is required, the P* should use that height to compute GO/NO-GO torque and predicted hover torque.
    2. The P will monitor the aircraft instruments and verify the power check. The P will compare the actual performance data to that computed and announce the results to the P*. The crew will evaluate and determine why there are any differences between computed and actual performance data. Any time the load or environmental conditions change significantly (200 pounds gross weight increase, 500 feet PA increase, or ± 5 degrees Celsius), the crewmembers will perform additional hover power checks and, if necessary, recompute the PPC using tabular data. (See Task 1011.) Note: If the torque required to maintain a stationary hover does not exceed the GO/NO-GO torque out-of-ground effect (OGE), any maneuver requiring OGE/IGE power or less may be attempted. If the torque required to maintain a stationary hover exceeds the GO/NO-GO torque OGE but does not exceed the GO/NO-GO torque IGE, only IGE maneuvers may be attempted.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS: The crew must use proper scanning techniques to avoid excessive drift.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


TASK 1030 : PERFORM HOVER OUT-OF-GROUND EFFECT CHECK

CONDITIONS : In a UH-1 helicopter with hover out-of-ground effect (OGE) power available and the aircraft heading into the wind.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Establish a hover altitude of 50 feet or above surrounding obstacles whichever is higher.
  2. Determine if aircraft power and controllability are sufficient for maneuvers requiring OGE hover power.

DESCRIPTION : The P* will announce his intent to ascend vertically to 50 feet or above surrounding obstacles whichever is higher. The P* will remain focused outside the aircraft during the entire maneuver to maintain obstacle clearance. The P* will execute a 360-degree left pedal turn. The pilot not on the controls (P) will monitor the exhaust gas temperature (EGT), torque, and other aircraft instruments, and the nonrated crewmember (NCM) will maintain airspace surveillance. During the pedal turn, the P* will check the controllability of the aircraft. The P* will announce their intent to descend vertically to an in-ground effect (IGE) hover or to the ground. Note : Hover OGE power is required for this task. Note : The crew should perform a hover OGE check anytime aircraft controllability or available power is in doubt.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. The P* may have difficulty maintaining altitude and position when hovering above 25 feet. (The barometric altimeter is not reliable for this maneuver.) If available, a radar altimeter should be used to assist in maintaining a constant altitude. Otherwise, references such as lights, tops of trees, or man-made objects above and to the front and sides of the aircraft should be used. By establishing a reference angle to these objects, the P* can detect changes in altitude by changes in their viewing perspective.
  2. Hovering near ground features, such as roads, provides ideal references for judging lateral movement. The P* may become spatially disoriented when changing viewing perspective back and forth between high and low references. Therefore, the P* must rely on the P and NCM for assistance in maintaining orientation.
  3. When wearing NVG, the crew must select an area with good ground contrast and several reference points at the same height, or at a greater height than the OGE hover. This will aid the P* in maintaining a constant altitude and position over the ground while making the required turns. The crew must use proper scanning techniques to ensure obstacle avoidance and tail rotor clearance. To prevent inadvertent aircraft movement while hovering OGE, the P* will remain focused outside the aircraft and the P will monitor all aircraft instruments.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references


TASK 1032 : Perform radio communication procedures

CONDITIONS: In a helicopter.

STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Rated.
    1. Check and operate aircraft avionics.
    2. Establish radio contact with the desired unit or air traffic control (ATC) facility.
    3. When communicating with ATC facilities, use correct radio communication procedures and phraseology.
    4. Operate the intercommunication system.
    5. Perform or describe two-way radio failure procedures.
  2. Nonrated.
    1. Operate the intercommunication system to communicate with the crew.
    2. Use the appropriate radio to communicate with the desired facility (as required for nonrated crewmembers [NCMs).

DESCRIPTION :

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot in command (PC) will determine radio frequencies per mission requirements during the crew briefing and will indicate whether the pilot on the controls (P*) or pilot not on the controls (P) will establish and maintain primary communications.
    2. The P* will announce information not monitored by the P.
    3. The P will adjust avionics to required frequencies. The P will copy pertinent information and announce information not monitored by the P*.
    4. During normal operations, the NCM will monitor external communications so as not to interrupt when external communications are being transmitted or received. (Monitoring external communications may not be desirable during operations requiring extensive internal communication; for example, sling loads, hoist, rappelling, or emergencies.)
    5. Certain operations may require that the NCM transmit on an aircraft radio (for example, MEDEVAC). The NCM will coordinate with the PC before using aircraft radios.
    6. Crew actions for two-way radio failure:
      1. P* or P will announce two-way radio failure to all crewmembers.
      2. The PC will direct the efforts to identify and correct the avionics malfunction.
      3. The P* will focus outside the aircraft during visual meteorological conditions (VMC) or inside during instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) on the instruments, as appropriate, but should not participate in trouble-shooting the malfunction.
      4. The P will remain focused primarily inside the aircraft to identify and correct the avionics malfunction.
    7. Crew actions for aircraft intercom failure: The PC will direct assistance from the crew to try to determine the malfunction and correct it. Actions may include switching to a different intercommunication system (ICS) box, changing microphone cords (if available), hooking.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Adjust avionics to the required frequencies. Continuously monitor the avionics as directed by the PC. When required, establish communications with the desired facility. Monitor the frequency before transmitting. Transmit the desired/required information. Use the correct radio call sign when acknowledging each communication. When advised to change frequencies, acknowledge instructions. Select the new frequency as soon as possible unless instructed to do so at a specific time, fix, or altitude. Use radio communication procedures and phraseology as appropriate for the area of operations. Use standard terms and phraseology for all intercommunications
    2. Procedures for two-way radio failure. Attempt to identify and correct the malfunctioning radio and announce the results. If two-way radio failure is confirmed, comply with procedure outlined in the flight information handbook (FIH).

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training may be conducted in the aircraft or simulator.
  2. Evaluation may be conducted in the aircraft or simulator.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references plus the following:

DOT/FAA 7110.65


TASK 1034 : Perform Ground Taxi

CONDITIONS : In a Mi-17 helicopter or a Mi-17 FS on a suitable surface, with the before-taxi/after landing check completed, and the aircraft cleared.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards and the following additions/modifications:

  1. RCM.
    1. Maintain a constant speed appropriate for conditions and stay within ground control limitations.
    2. Maintain desired ground track.
    3. Maintain flight controls according to operators manual.
  2. NCM.
    1. Perform applicable checks in accordance with operator’s manual/CL and the unit SOP when read by the P.
    2. Immediately inform the RCMs of any observed discrepancy or malfunction.
    3. Clear the aircraft.
    4. Use hand-and-arm signals, if required, in accordance with FM 21-60.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. The P* will ensure the main-rotor revolutions per minute (RPM) is within limits and the parking brake is released. The P* will announce his intent to begin the taxi, state the taxi plan, and clear the aircraft.
  2. The P and CE will assist the P* in clearing the aircraft.
  3. The P* will initiate the taxi by increasing the collective slightly (a 1- to 3-degree pitch) and moving the cyclic slightly forward to start movement. Perform taxi check (brakes, heading and turn indicators). When the aircraft starts moving, reduce the collective to the minimum required to maintain movement at the desired speed. Control heading with the pedals. Use left and right pedal input to turn the aircraft and a slightly lateral cyclic into turns to maintain a level fuselage attitude (cyclic movement should be minimized to avoid droop-stop pounding). Regulate taxi speed with a combination of cyclic, collective, and necessary brake applications. Soft, rough, or sloping terrain may require the use of more or less power than would normally be required. Note. The P* may use lateral cyclic inputs to assist with directional control. These inputs are normally required while taxiing in a crosswind. Adhere to crosswind restrictions.
  4. When the NCM is required outside the aircraft during taxi, he or she will be positioned where the P*/P can clearly see all hand-and-arm signals or will remain attached to the aircraft communication system.

Note. Emergency stops may be performed with the wheel brakes or by bringing the aircraft to a hover, depending on ground velocity.

Note. Do not attempt cyclic aerodynamic braking during taxi. Note. Ground taxi is prohibited with wind speeds in excess of 29 knots (hovering is an alternative).

Note. If during taxi, helicopter vibration increases (ground resonance), immediately reduce collective, center the cyclic, and retard throttle to idle. If vibration persists, perform emergency shutdown (fuel stopcocks closed, fuel pumps off, fuel fire shutoff valves closed).

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS : Aircraft taxi at night or with NVG requires a constant scan by every crewmember to ensure obstacle clearance. Use of artificial illumination, such as the white or infrared (IR) landing/search lights, taxi light, and/or blade tip lights may be necessary for safe operations as determined by the P*. Position lights; anti collision light should be set to bright. The P* will utilize a ground guide when taxi is required in a congested area. Taxi speeds may need to be reduced.

SNOW/SAND/DUST CONSIDERATIONS: If ground reference is lost due to blowing snow/sand/dust, lower the collective, neutralize the flight controls, and apply wheel brakes until visual reference is reestablished.

Note. Use caution when taxiing near other maneuvering aircraft because of limited visual references and relative motion illusion.

Note. Due to decreased visual references and possibility of relative motion illusion, limit ground speed to a rate appropriate for conditions.

Note. At night, use the landing, search, taxi, blade tip, or anti collision lights may cause spatial disorientation in blowing snow/sand/dust.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted at the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted at the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references and FM 21-60.


TASK 1038 : PERFORM HOVERING FLIGHT

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will announce their intent to perform a specific hovering flight maneuver and will remain focused primarily outside the aircraft to monitor altitude and avoid obstacles. The P* will ensure and announce that the aircraft is cleared prior to turning or re positioning the aircraft. The P* will announce terminating the maneuver.
    2. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will assist in clearing the aircraft and provide adequate warning of obstacles, unannounced drift, or altitude changes. They will announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when attention is reestablished outside.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Takeoff to a hover. With the collective full down, place the cyclic in a neutral position. Increase the collective smoothly. Apply pedals to maintain heading, and coordinate the cyclic for a vertical ascent. As the aircraft leaves the ground, check for the proper control response and aircraft center of gravity (CG). Continue to increase collective for a smooth, controlled ascent to a hover.
    2. Hovering flight. Adjust the cyclic to maintain a stationary hover or to move in the desired direction. Control heading with the pedals, and maintain altitude with the collective. The rate of movement and altitude should be appropriate for existing conditions. To return to a stationary hover, apply cyclic in the opposite direction while maintaining altitude with the collective and heading with the pedals. Note: Air taxi is the preferred method for ground movements on airports provided ground operations and conditions permit. Unless otherwise requested or instructed, pilots are expected to remain below 100 feet above ground level (AGL). However, if a higher than normal airspeed or altitude is desired, the request should be made prior to lift-off. The pilot is solely responsible for selecting a safe airspeed for the altitude/operation being conducted. Use of air taxi enables the pilot to proceed at an optimum airspeed/altitude, minimize down wash effect, conserve fuel, and expedite movement from one point to another.
    3. Hovering turns. Apply pressure to the desired pedal to begin the turn. Use pressure and counter pressure on the pedals to maintain the desired rate of turn. Coordinate cyclic control to maintain position over the pivot point while maintaining altitude with the collective. Hovering turns can be made around any vertical axis; for example, the nose, mast, tail of the aircraft, or a point in front of the aircraft. However, turns other than about the center of the aircraft will increase the turn radius proportionately.
    4. Landing from a hover. Lower the collective to affect a smooth, controlled descent with minimal drift at touchdown. Ensure the aircraft does not move laterally or aft. Make necessary corrections with the pedals and cyclic to maintain a constant heading and position. On ground contact, ensure that the aircraft remains stable. Continue lowering the collective smoothly and steadily while continuing to check aircraft stability. When the collective is fully down, neutralize the pedals and cyclic. If sloping conditions are suspected or anticipated, (see Task 1062).

Note: Cyclic turns should only be used when necessary.

Note: When landing from a hover to an unimproved area, the crew must check for obstacles under the

aircraft.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. Movement over areas of limited contrast, such as tall grass, water, or desert, tends to cause spatial disorientation. Seek hover areas that provide adequate contrast and use proper scanning techniques. If disorientation occurs, apply sufficient power and execute a takeoff. If a takeoff is not feasible, try to maneuver the aircraft forward and down to the ground to limit the possibility of touchdown with sideward or rearward movement.
  2. When performing operations during unaided night flight, ensure that the searchlight or landing light (white light) is in the desired position. Use of the white light will impair night vision for several minutes. Therefore, exercise added caution if resuming flight before reaching full dark adaptation.

SNOW/SAND/DUST CONSIDERATIONS: During ascent to a hover, if visual references do not deteriorate to an unacceptable level, continue ascent to the desired hover altitude.

  1. The 3 to 5-foot hover taxi. During takeoff to a hover, simultaneously accelerate the aircraft to a ground speed that keeps the snow/sand/dust cloud just aft of the main rotor mast. Note: Maintain optimum visibility by observing references close to the aircraft. Exercise caution when operating in close proximity to other aircraft or obstacles. Note: When visual references deteriorate making a 3-foot hover taxi unsafe, determine whether to abort the maneuver, air taxi, or perform an instrument takeoff (ITO) (Task 1170).
  2. The 20- to 100-foot air taxi. Use this maneuver when it is necessary to move the aircraft over terrain that is unsuitable for hover taxi. Initiate air taxi the same as a 3-foot hover, but increase altitude to not more than 100 feet and accelerate to a safe airspeed appropriate for conditions, above effective transitional lift (ETL).

Note: Ensure that an area is available to safely decelerate and land the aircraft. Under certain conditions, such as adverse winds, it may be necessary to perform a traffic pattern to optimize conditions at the desired termination point.

Note: Hovering out-of-ground effect (OGE) reduces available ground references and may increase the possibility of spatial disorientation. Be prepared to transition to instruments and execute an instrument takeoff (ITO) (Task 1170) or unusual attitude recovery (Task 1182) if ground reference is lost.

Note: At night, use of landing, search, or anti-collision light may cause spatial disorientation while in blowing snow/sand/dust.

Note: OGE power may be required for this maneuver.

CONFINED AREA CONSIDERATIONS : Select good references to avoid unanticipated drift. All crewmembers must be focused primarily outside for obstacle avoidance.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS :

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


TASK 1040 : PERFORM VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS TAKEOFF

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter with the hover power and before-takeoff checks completed.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Maintain takeoff heading ± 10 degrees below 50 feet above ground level (AGL).
  2. Maintain desired ground track.
  3. Maintain aircraft in trim above 50 feet AGL or as appropriate for transition to terrain flight.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot in command (PC) will determine the direction of takeoff by analyzing the tactical situation, the wind, the long axis of the takeoff area, and the lowest obstacles. The PC will confirm that required power is available by comparing the information from the performance planning card (PPC) to the hover power check.
    2. The pilot on the controls (P*) will remain focused primarily outside the aircraft throughout the maneuver to provide obstacle clearance. The P* will announce whether the takeoff is from the ground or from a hover and his intent to abort or alter the takeoff. The P* will select reference points to assist in maintaining the desired ground track.
    3. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will announce when ready for takeoff and will remain focused primarily outside the aircraft to assist in clearing and to provide adequate warning of obstacles. They will announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when their attention is reestablished outside.
    4. The P will monitor the instruments and advise the P* if power limits are being approached.
  2. Procedures.
    1. From the ground. Select reference points to maintain the desired ground track. With the cyclic and pedals in the neutral position, increase collective. As the aircraft leaves the ground, maintain heading with pedals and apply forward cyclic as required to smoothly accelerate through effective transitional lift (ETL) at an appropriate altitude for the terrain and to avoid obstacles. Adjust the cyclic as necessary (approximately 5 degrees nose down), obtain the desired climb airspeed, and maintain the desired ground track. Position the collective as necessary to clear obstacles in the flight path, and obtain the desired rate of climb. Maintain heading with the pedals when below 50 feet AGL or until transitioning to terrain flight; place the aircraft in trim above 50 feet AGL. After obtaining the desired airspeed, adjust the cyclic as necessary to stop the acceleration. Adjust the collective to continue or stop the rate of climb as required.
    2. From a hover. Select reference points to maintain desired ground track; maintain heading with the pedals. Apply forward cyclic to smoothly accelerate the aircraft through ETL while adjusting the collective to maintain the appropriate hover height. Perform the rest of the maneuver as for a takeoff from the ground.

Note: Avoid unnecessary nose-low accelerative attitudes. Do not exceed 10 degrees nose low.

Note: Performing this maneuver in certain environments may require hover out-of-ground effect (OGE) power. Evaluate each situation for power required versus power available. Note: The P* should determine the torque required for the planned takeoff technique and announce the value to the P and NCM(s).

Note: For training, recommended climb airspeed is 70 KIAS with a rate of climb of 500 FPM.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. If sufficient illumination exists to view obstacles, accomplish the takeoff in the same way as a visual meteorological conditions (VMC) takeoff during the day. Visual obstacles, such as shadows, should be treated the same as physical obstacles.
  2. If sufficient illumination does not exist to view obstacles, perform an altitude-over-airspeed takeoff by applying takeoff power first followed by a slow acceleration to ensure obstacle clearance. The P* may perform the takeoff from a hover or from the ground.
    1. Maintain the takeoff power setting until approximately 10 knots prior to reaching climb airspeed. Adjust power as required to establish the desired rate of climb and cyclic to maintain the desired airspeed.
    2. The P* and NCM should maintain orientation outside the aircraft and concentrate on obstacle avoidance. The P should make all internal checks and announce when the instruments show a positive climb inside.
    3. Reduced visual references during the takeoff and throughout the ascent at night may make it difficult to maintain the desired ground track. Knowledge of the surface wind direction and velocity will assist in maintaining the desired ground track.
  3. When performing operations during unaided night flight, ensure that the searchlight or landing light (white light) is in the desired position. Use of the white light will impair night vision several minutes. Therefore, exercise added caution if resuming flight before reaching full dark adaptation.

SNOW/SAND/DUST CONSIDERATIONS: Adjust collective and cyclic as necessary to ascend vertically. As the aircraft leaves the surface, maintain heading with the pedals and a level attitude with the cyclic. As the aircraft clears the snow/sand/dust cloud and clears the barriers, accelerate to climb airspeed and trim the aircraft.

Note: In some cases, applying collective to blow away loose snow/sand/dust from around the aircraft is beneficial before performing this maneuver.

Note: Be prepared to transition to instruments and execute an ITO (Task 1075) if ground reference is lost.

Note: At night, use of the landing, search, or anti-collision lights may cause spatial disorientation while in blowing snow/sand/dust.

CONFINED AREA CONSIDERATIONS : Before departure, confirm the takeoff plan. Perform a hover power check as required. Reposition the aircraft, if desired, to afford a shallower departure angle and minimize power requirements. During departure, adjust the cyclic and the collective as required to establish a constant departure angle to clear obstacles. All crewmembers must be focused primarily outside for obstacle avoidance.

MOUNTAIN/PINNACLE/RIDGELINE CONSIDERATIONS: Analyze winds, obstacles, and density altitude. Perform a hover power check as required. Determine the best takeoff direction and path for  conditions. After clearing any obstacles accelerate the aircraft to the desired airspeed. Note: Where drop-offs are located along the takeoff path, the aircraft may be maneuvered down slope to gain airspeed.

MUD/MUSKEG/TUNDRA CONSIDERATIONS: Perform one of the following takeoff techniques:

  1. From dry muskeg/tundra areas. A vertical takeoff may be best in drier areas where the aircraft has not sunk into the muskeg/tundra or where obstacles prohibit motion. Smoothly increase the collective until the crew confirms that the skids/skis are free. Adjust controls as necessary to perform a VMC takeoff.
  2. From wet areas. In wet areas where the aircraft is likely to have sunk or is stuck in the mud/muskeg/tundra, the following technique may be best: With the cyclic in the neutral position, smoothly increase the collective. As hover power is approached, place the cyclic slightly forward of the neutral position and slowly move the pedals back and forth. Continue increasing the collective and "swim" the aircraft forward to break the suction of the skids/skis. When free, adjust the controls as necessary to perform a VMC takeoff.

Note: Before performing operations in a mud/muskeg/tundra environment, it is important to understand dynamic rollover characteristics.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


 TASK 1044 : NAVIGATE BY PILOTAGE AND DEAD RECKONING

CONDITIONS: In a helicopter and given the appropriate maps, plotter, flight computer, and flight log.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications: Maintain orientation within 500 meters. Arrive at check points/destination at estimated time of arrival (ETA) ±3 minutes.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will focus primarily outside the aircraft and respond to navigation instructions or cues given by the pilot not on the controls (P). The P* will acknowledge commands issued by the P for the heading, altitude, and airspeed changes necessary to navigate the desired course. The P* will announce significant surface features to assist in navigation.
    2. The P will direct the P* to change aircraft heading, altitude, and airspeed as appropriate to navigate the desired course. The P will use rally terms, specific headings, relative bearings, or key terrain features to accomplish this task. The P will announce all plotted wires before approaching their location. The P and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will monitor aircraft instruments, assist in clearing the aircraft, and provide adequate warning to avoid traffic and obstacles. The P and NCM will announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when attention is reestablished outside.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Both pilotage and dead reckoning will be used to maintain the position of the aircraft along the planned route. Planned headings will be adjusted as necessary to compensate for the effects of the wind.
    2. Perform a ground speed check as soon as possible by computing the actual time required to fly a known distance. Adjust estimated times for subsequent legs of the flight route using the computed ground speed. Compare planned ground speed with computed ground speed and adjust airspeed as required to arrive at each control point at its original ETA.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS: More detailed flight planning is required when the flight is conducted at night. Interior cockpit lighting should be considered when selecting colors for preparing navigational aids such as maps and kneeboard notes.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES : Appropriate common references.


TASK 1046 : PERFORM ELECTRONICALLY AIDED NAVIGATION

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter with an electronically aided navigation system installed and operational.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus the following additions/modifications:

  1. Operate the installed electronically aided navigational system per the appropriate TM.
  2. Determine the position of the aircraft along the route of flight within 300 meters.
  3. Use the NAV SEL per the appropriate aircraft operator’s manual if coupled with an electronically aided navigational system.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The P* will focus primarily outside the aircraft and respond to navigation instructions or cues given by the P. The P* will acknowledge commands issued by the P for the heading, altitude, and airspeed changes necessary to navigate the desired course. The P* will announce significant terrain features to assist in navigation.
    2. The P will be the primary operator of the electronically aided navigation system. The P will direct the P* to change aircraft heading, altitude, and airspeed as appropriate to navigate the desired course. The P will use rally terms, specific headings, relative bearings, or key terrain features to accomplish this task. The P will announce all plotted wires before approaching their location. The P and NCM will monitor aircraft instruments, assist in clearing the aircraft, and provide adequate warning to avoid traffic and obstacles. Note: Only the P will perform in-flight time/labor intensive NAV programming duties (for example, building routes).
  2. Procedures. Perform the turn on, test, and programming procedures per the appropriate TM. If the electronically aided navigational system is coupled, the selected course may be flown using the NAV SEL. The proper updating and shutdown procedures will be performed per the appropriate TM.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training. Training may be conducted in the aircraft or simulator.
  2. Evaluation. The evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


TASK 1048 : Perform fuel management procedures

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter with a CPU-26A/P computer (or equivalent) or calculator.

STANDARDS : Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Rated
    1. Verify that the required amount of fuel is on board at the time of departure.
    2. Initiate an alternate course of action if the actual fuel consumption varies from the planned value and the flight cannot be completed without the planned use of the required reserve.
    3. Balance/manage fuel tank levels to maintain aircraft within center of gravity (CG) limits.
  2. Rated/Nonrated.
    1. Initiate an in-flight fuel consumption check within 10 minutes after leveling off or entering into the mission profile.
    2. Compute the fuel consumption rate ±50 pounds per hour and complete the fuel check 15 to 30 minutes after taking the initial readings.
    3. Monitor the remaining fuel quantity and the continuing rate of consumption.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The P or NCM will record the initial fuel figures, fuel flow computation, burnout, and reserve times. They will announce when initiating the fuel check and when completing the fuel check. The P or NCM also will announce the results of the fuel check.
    2. The pilot on the controls (P*) will acknowledge the results of the fuel check.
    3. The pilot in command (PC) will confirm the results of the fuel check.
    4. If applicable, the P will announce when the fuel transfer switch or fuel selector lever(s) are repositioned and when the fuel transfer operation is completed.
    5. The NCM will acknowledge and monitor the fuel transfer operation until the operation is completed.
  2. Procedures.
    1. Before-takeoff fuel check. Determine the total fuel on board, and compare it with fuel required for the mission. If the fuel on board is inadequate, add sufficient fuel or abort or revise the mission.
    2. Initial airborne fuel reading. Within 10 minutes after leveling off or entering into the mission profile, record the total fuel quantity and the time of reading. Record the remaining fuel and the time of reading 15 to 30 minutes after taking the initial airborne fuel reading. Compute and record the consumption rate, burnout time, and reserve entry time. Determine if the remaining fuel is sufficient to complete the flight without the planned use of the required reserve. If the amount of fuel is inadequate, initiate an alternate course of action. Note: Crews should verify ability to transfer fuel from auxiliary to internal tanks before using auxiliary tank fuel quantities in fuel reserve/burnout computations. Note: Do not perform fuel consumption checks while transferring fuel from auxiliary tank(s) to internal fuel tanks.
    3. Fuel quantity and consumption. Periodically monitor the fuel quantity and consumption rate. If the fuel quantity or flow indicates a deviation from computed values, repeat the fuel consumption check to determine if the amount of fuel is adequate to complete the flight. Periodically check individual fuel tank indicators to determine that the system is operating properly.
    4. Auxiliary fuel management. The aircraft operator's manual outlines the procedures to be followed when auxiliary fuel tanks are used.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION GOGGLE CONSIDERATIONS: The P should complete all duties associated with fuel management procedures. If the controls are transferred, the other aviator will verify fuel computations.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training may be conducted in the aircraft or simulator.
  2. Evaluation may be conducted in the aircraft or simulator.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references plus:

Manufacturer's operating manuals.


TASK 1052 : PERFORM VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS FLIGHT MANEUVERS

CONDITIONS : In a helicopter.

STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus these additions/modifications:

  1. Turns.
    1. Clear the aircraft.
    2. Rollout on desired heading ± 10 degrees.
  2. Climbs and descents.
    1. Clear aircraft.
    2. Stop climb/descent at desired altitude ± 100 feet.
  3. Traffic pattern flight.
    1. Enter, operate in, and depart a traffic pattern.

DESCRIPTION:

  1. Crew actions.
    1. The pilot on the controls (P*) will remain focused primarily outside the aircraft. They will announce and clear each turn, climb, and descent.
    2. The pilot not on the controls (P) and nonrated crewmember (NCM) will assist in clearing the aircraft and will provide adequate warning of traffic and obstacles. They will announce when their attention is focused inside the aircraft and again when attention is reestablished outside.
  2. Procedures. Adjust cyclic as required to maintain the desired airspeed, course, ground track, or heading as appropriate. Adjust collective as required to maintain the desired climb/descent rate or altitude and maintain aircraft in trim with the pedals. Perform traffic pattern operations per air traffic control (ATC) directives, local standing operating procedures (SOPs), and FM 1-203.

NIGHT OR NIGHT VISION CONSIDERATIONS:

  1. The P* will focus primarily outside the aircraft and should concentrate on obstacle avoidance and aircraft control. The P will make all internal cockpit checks.
  2. During periods of reduced illumination or marginal weather, the P* may reduce the recommended airspeed and bank angle. The turns from upwind to downwind and downwind to final may be continuous, coordinated turns.

TRAINING CONSIDERATIONS: For traffic pattern training, the recommended airspeed and rate of climb/descent on crosswind and base legs are 70 KIAS and 500 feet per minute (FPM). The recommended airspeed on downwind leg is 90 KIAS. Recommended bank angle for turns is 30 degrees.

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Training will be conducted in aircraft.
  2. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.

REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.

News Digest

In case you guys don't have hours to spend on the ED forum, here are a few things that you might have missed;

Some rendering of the upcoming BO-105 from PolyChop

Love the stabilized sight with laser designation capability. This will make an awesome scout chopper for combined A-10 operation. Too bad the designation won't work with the Russian systems like the one on the Ka-50.

SA-342 Gazelle Mistral version Demo

 AA Mistral missile demo on the Gazelle. This will be a new model. It won't be able to take anything else but 4 Mistral missiles.

Caucasus Map for DCSW 2.5

Wags posted a few shots from the upgraded version of the Caucasus map they are working on for the 2.5 release which will finally merge it with the Nevada one and bring all the eye candy from the latter. This graphical upgrade was not originally planned so this is extra work for ED team hence an expected release date for end of 2016.

Some features will have a significant impact on rotary wings like possibly tree collision (like Nevada), corrected parallax for river and lakes (less NOE flights ending up in the water), new ground objects, more trees and maybe a higher resolution terrain elevation mesh.

SA-342 Gazelle update announced with multi crew!

We were expecting the AA Mistral capability of course (and it will be part of the update) but the surprise came from the multi crew capability announcement. We will soon have the possibility to fly the Gazelle with 2 players, one pilot and one HOT3 operator.

 

DCS World 1.5.4 Update 1

A few things for us; the Ka50 can ne repaired again on FARP and the power lines are back. Flood lights restored. Server list sorting feature back too.

Auto-rotation party!

Last night, Eagle_Rising was kind enough to provide us with his fantastic knowledge on auto-rotations. Needless to say the total cost resulting from all the helicopters destroyed during this lesson was probably equal to a small country GDP. But we are now all more or less able to crawl alive from the cockpit following an engine failure. Thanks man! Thread HERE.


Briefing time!

Eye candy from previous night's flights

Waaaay too much fun last night (ended up past 1 am!) with BSD pilots. Thanks to all of you guys. Dreamy high altitude/dynamic weather operations and SA342 Model L flight testing. A taste of the screenshots posted on the debrief section of BSD forum. Check them out!

Gazelles ready to take off

Dogfight

Eye candy from last night's flights

Waaaay too much fun last night (ended up past 1 am!) with BSD pilots. Thanks to all of you guys. Dreamy high altitude/dynamic weather operations and SA342 Model L flight testing. A taste of the screenshots posted on the debrief section of BSD forum. Check them out!

Gazelles ready to take off

Dogfight

Eagle_Rising got Wings!

 

 

 

Today is an awesome day for one of our most active member Eagle_Rising as he just received his wings as a US UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter pilot. Congratulations to you! We are all jealous.

To properly celebrate this on BSD (and also because he is flying with us all the time, making awesome briefings, flying Gazelle and Ka50 beautifuly and always giving great advices about rotarywings operations), Eagle Rising is also granted full pilot rank at Blacksharkden! OK, not as cool as wings IRL, but that's the best we can do!

 

And, there's more!

1.5.4 Stable is released today with crazy amount of new stuff. Of course, the new Gazelle version L with guns and rockets, new FM for the M version, but also lot of bug fixes for Mi-8, Huey and... Blackshark! Finaly, new cool stuff for the ME like the ability to cold start choppers anywhere on the map and not just on FARP and airports. This is really a good day today.